Government of Canada
Symbol of the Government of Canada

Government of Canada

japan.gc.ca

Breadcrumb

  1. Home
  2. >
  3. For Canadians
  4. >
  5. Living / Travelling in Japan

Citizenship

Attention: Name Policy

Effective May 31, 2013, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) has instituted new procedures on establishing consistent name records in their systems for all lines of business (Citizenship, Passport, Permanent Resident, etc.). The procedures emphasize the significance of using the most reliable documentary evidence available pertaining to the name of an individual, rather than using a name at the request of the applicant.

The Name Policy does not allow for statutory declarations concerning names. The primary document used to establish the name record is the applicant's foreign birth certificate. If the applicant is unable to provide a foreign birth certificate, the name indicated on their passport or travel document will be used to establish the name record.

Some applicants may present documentation containing a name (or names) that is in accordance with Japan's naming convention but is not necessarily the name with which the applicant identifies. In these instances, the applicant may seek a legal change of name once in Canada, in accordance with the policies/procedures of the province or territory of residence.

 

Return of Citizenship Certificates by Mail

As of April 1, 2015, we require a self-addressed LetterPack PLUS envelope to return your original documents to you if you send in your application by post.

LetterPack Plus is a prepaid envelope used to return your documents by express post that can also be tracked. LetterPack Plus is available at any Japan Post Office and most convenience stores for 510 yen.

We will contact you when your Citizenship Certificate is ready to have you send another LetterPack PLUS envelope in order to return the certificate to you, or to have you pick it up in person if you prefer.

Please use this link to track your LetterPack PLUS.


Applying for Citizenship


Canadian Citizenship — Children Born Abroad

The proof of Canadian citizenship for a Canadian born abroad is a Canadian citizenship certificate. A child born outside Canada to a Canadian parent and meeting certain requirements is a Canadian citizen. However the child will not possess a birth certificate issued by a Canadian governmental authority and for proof of Canadian citizenship, the child will need to obtain a Canadian citizenship certificate. An application must be submitted to obtain this certificate. Although applications are processed in Canada, you may submit the application to a Canadian diplomatic office abroad. In Japan, such applications can be submitted to the Canadian Embassy in Tokyo.

For details on how to apply, please read How to Apply for a Canadian Citizenship Certificate for a Child Born Outside Canada.

The Embassy will not accept applications that are incomplete, or which have been incorrectly completed. Incomplete or incorrect applications will be returned to the applicant and will only be processed once all documentation has been submitted and/or the application correctly submitted.


Canadian Citizenship — Replacement Certificates

If you have had a Canadian citizenship certificate lost or stolen you should apply as soon as possible for a replacement. While applications are processed in Canada, you can submit the application to a Canadian diplomatic office abroad. In Japan such applications can be submitted to the Canadian Embassy in Tokyo.

For details on how to apply, please read How to Apply for a Replacement Citizenship Certificate.


Dual Nationality

Canada permits dual or multiple nationality. However in accordance with Japanese law, a Japanese citizen having a foreign nationality shall choose either of the nationalities before he or she reaches twenty two years of age (or within two years of acquisition of the second nationality if acquisition took place after the age of twenty). Please see the website of the Ministry of Justice of Japan for further details.


Instructions

How to Apply for a Canadian Citizenship Certificate for a Child Born Outside Canada

A child born to a Canadian parent and meeting certain requirements is a Canadian citizen at birth. To determine if your child, born outside Canada, is a Canadian citizen at birth, please see New Citizenship Rules. Proof of the child's citizenship, in the form of a Certificate of Canadian Citizenship (CCC) can be applied for at any time after the child's birth. The following documentation will need to be presented:

  1. Complete an application form.
  2. Two photographs of the child as per the specifications.
  3. The child's official record of birth which establishes the relationship between the child and the Canadian parent. In Japan this is usually the Certificate of Acceptance of Registration of Birth (shussei todoke no juri shomesho) issued by ward or city offices, along with an accurate typed translation. This document must bear the names of the parents. The Family Register (koseki tohon or koseki shohon) with an accurate typed translation can also be accepted if the child also has Japanese citizenship. Hospital records of birth are not acceptable.
    Translation in English or French is required (please see information below).
  4. The original of the parent's document which establishes his/her own Canadian citizenship. This is usually a birth certificate or a Canadian Citizenship Certificate.
  5. Two additional pieces of personal identification for the child (original documents required) along with typed, accurate translations, such as Mother and Child Handbook (boshi techo) health insurance card, resident card (jumin hyo), hospital appointment card, hospital birth certificate, foreign passport, etc.
    Translation in English or French is required (please see information below).
  6. The fee.
  7. A self-addressed LetterPack Plus envelope for the return of your original documents by mail.

If you wish for your original documents to be returned by post but do not include a LetterPack Plus envelope, we will return your original documents to you cash on delivery. Please note that the Embassy is not responsible for delivery times.


Translated Documents

Any document that is not in English or French must be accompanied by

  • the English or French translation, and
  • an affidavit from the person who completed the translation.

Note: An affidavit is a document on which the translator has sworn, in the presence of a person authorized to administer oaths in the country in which the translator is living (Canadian Embassy/Consulate or Notary Public in Japan), that the contents of their translation are a true translation and representation of the contents of the original document. Translators who are certified members in good standing of one of the provincial or territorial organizations of translators and interpreters of Canada do not need to supply an affidavit.

  • At the Embassy of Canada, the translator's affidavit can be notarized at the same time as the submission of the application at the Embassy of Canada (09:30-12:00, Monday to Friday except Embassy holidays without an appointment. The translator needs to appear in person and the notary service fee will apply.
  • For service at the Consulates of Canada in Japan, please contact them directly to make an appointment in advance. The translator needs to appear in person and the notary service fee will apply.

The translator's affidavit can also be notarized at a local notary public. A list of notary public offices can be found here (in Japanese only).

Important information: Translations by family members are not acceptable.

Family member is defined as being a: parent, guardian, sibling, spouse, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew and first cousin.

Your application will be returned to you if you do not include the translation of your documents and an affidavit from the translator.

Please click for a list of translators.

Canadian citizenship certificates are issued in Canada, and you should expect that it will take upwards of a year for issuance.

A person whose Canadian citizenship is documented as above remains a citizen until such time as he/she renounces citizenship. Renunciation requires a formal application and official acceptance of this application.


How to Apply for a Replacement Citizenship Certificate

A person who is applying to replace a Canadian citizenship certificate must:

  1. complete an application form.
  2. surrender any/all original citizenship/naturalization certificates and any pink transmission copies that may be in your possession.
  3. submit two pieces of personal identification. Photocopies of these documents are acceptable. If original documents are submitted to the Embassy or Consulate, we will make the necessary copies and return the originals to you.
  4. submit any other documentation which may apply to your circumstance such as legal change of name documentation, marriage certificate, etc.
  5. submit two photographs as per the specifications and instructions shown on the application form.
  6. submit the fee.
  7. submit a self-addressed LetterPack Plus envelope for the return of your original documents by mail.

If you wish for your original documents to be returned by post but do not include a LetterPack Plus envelope, we will return your original documents to you cash on delivery. Please note that the Embassy is not responsible for delivery times.


Translated Documents

Any document that is not in English or French must be accompanied by

  • the English or French translation, and
  • an affidavit from the person who completed the translation.

Note: An affidavit is a document on which the translator has sworn, in the presence of a person authorized to administer oaths in the country in which the translator is living (Canadian Embassy/Consulate or Notary Public in Japan), that the contents of their translation are a true translation and representation of the contents of the original document. Translators who are certified members in good standing of one of the provincial or territorial organizations of translators and interpreters of Canada do not need to supply an affidavit.

  • At the Embassy of Canada, the translator's affidavit can be notarized at the same time as the submission of the application at the Embassy of Canada (09:30-12:00, Monday to Friday except Embassy holidays without an appointment. The translator needs to appear in person and the notary service fee will apply.
  • For service at the Consulates of Canada in Japan, please contact them directly to make an appointment in advance. The translator needs to appear in person and the notary service fee will apply.

The translator's affidavit can also be notarized at a local notary public. A list of notary public offices can be found here (in Japanese only).

Important information: Translations by family members are not acceptable.

Family member is defined as being a: parent, guardian, sibling, spouse, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew and first cousin.

Your application will be returned to you if you do not include the translation of your documents and an affidavit from the translator.

Please click for a list of translators.


Mailing Address

Consular Section
Embassy of Canada
7-3-38 Akasaka, Minato-ku
Tokyo 107-8503, Japan

 


* If you require a plug-in or a third-party software to view this file, please visit the alternative formats section of our help page .

 

Footer

Date Modified:
2015-06-19