Government of Canada
Symbol of the Government of Canada

Government of Canada

NewZealand.gc.ca

Breadcrumb

  1. Home
  2. >
  3. Bilateral Relations

Canada-New Zealand Relations

In New Zealand, Canada is represented by the High Commission of Canada in Wellington. Canada also has a Consulate/Trade Office in Auckland. New Zealand is represented in Canada by a High Commission in Ottawa, a Consulate-General in Vancouver and Honorary Consuls in Toronto and Calgary.

Canada’s extensive bilateral relations with New Zealand are marked by an ongoing flow of two-way visits and meetings of Ministers, Parliamentarians, and government and military officials at all levels. In November 2014, Prime Minister Stephen Harper made an official  visit to New Zealand, following earlier visits that year by President of the Treasury Board Tony Clement and Minister of Foreign Affairs John Baird. Other visits of Canadian Ministers to New Zealand include Immigration Minister Jason Kenney and Defence Minister Peter Mackay in 2011 and International Trade Minister Ed Fast in 2012. In April 2010, New Zealand Prime Minister John Key paid an official visit to Ottawa. 

New Zealand is an important like-minded partner for Canada on a broad range of issues, including security and defence; international trade; counter-terrorism; human rights and humanitarian policy; indigenous issues; international fisheries and oceans governance; and education and culture. New Zealand has a strong commitment to multilateralism, and is one of the first countries to which Canada turns when seeking support for priorities in the United Nations (UN); the Commonwealth; the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum; and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Regional Forum. These close links are further strengthened under the informal Canada-Australia-New Zealand (CANZ) co-operation arrangement within the UN.

As a major player in the South Pacific, New Zealand assists Canada in understanding regional developments and providing practical support, as Canada does reciprocally in the Caribbean and Africa, where New Zealand has limited representation.

New Zealand’s indigenous Māori and Canada’s First Nations and Inuit peoples share a special relationship and are engaged in a broad range of business and cultural exchanges. The Māori King, Tuheitia Paki, led a visit to British Columbia First Nations peoples in June 2007.

New Zealand is a reliable and complementary trade partner for Canada, and the two countries co-operate closely in multilateral trade negotiations and the Cairns group of agricultural exporters. New Zealand and Canada share a modest level of trade and investment. In 2014, bilateral merchandise trade between the two countries totalled $1.028 billion. Canadian merchandise exports to New Zealand amounted to $414.3 million, with machinery, fertilizers, wood products and aircraft parts being Canada's top exports. Meat (primarily lamb and beef), beverages (primarily wine) and machinery are Canada’s top merchandise imports from New Zealand, which amounted to $613.9 million for the same period.

Canada is interested in New Zealand’s increasing economic engagement in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly as New Zealand became the first developed country to sign a free trade agreement with China in 2008. New Zealand is also a key member and the official depository for the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a multilateral free trade agreement for the Asia-Pacific region which is currently under negotiation.

June 2015


* If you require a plug-in or a third-party software to view this file, please visit the alternative formats section of our help page .

Footer

Date Modified:
2015-06-19